Faults and Troubleshooting FAQ

I hear strange noises from my amplifier, what could cause this?

A number of things can cause unusual noises to be heard through your amplifier. Please refer to this list of problems and possible cures:

 

  1. Clicking/buzzing sounds. Try placing your cell phone in another room separate from your amplifier and see if the sound disappears. Other devices such as police radios can cause this. Wait a day to see if the sound returns.

  2. Static, popping, or ringing. This is most commonly a preamp tube. Try replacing the preamp tube physically closest to the input jack. This is the first stage preamp tube that is most susceptible to static and microphonics (ringing). If this does not cure the problem, try replacing each preamp tube one by one until the problem disappears. You may also try tapping on each preamp tube with your fingernail or end of a pencil to check for microphonics.

  3. Humming. Maybe your amp forgot the words, or this may be caused by a number of things:

A. Amplifier plugged into the same circuit as a device with a motor, such as a refrigerator or air conditioning unit. Try moving amplifier to another part of the house and see if the hum disappears.

B. Faulty power tube. If this is suspected, please have amplifier looked at by a qualified technician.

C. Faulty reverb wire. Make sure reverb wires are well secured to both the jacks on the chassis and on the reverb pan.

D. Fluorescent lights. Turn off all fluorescent or neon lights.

 

If none of the above solved the problem, please contact us through tech support email, or refer to a qualified technician.

My reverb stopped working, what could be the problem?

This is usually caused by one of three things: The reverb tube, the reverb pan, or the wires that connect the pan to the amplifier chassis. First make sure the wires are properly connected to the chassis and the reverb pan. Next, you can try replacing the reverb tube. Please refer to the owner’s manual for the location of this tube. Finally you may try removing the reverb pan from the black bag at the bottom of the amplifier. Check inside of pan to see if there is a broken wire from the RCA jack to the small transducer by the springs. If none of this solves the problem and you’re handy with an ohmmeter, you may check for readings across the two jacks with no wires connected to the pan. You should read about 2 ohms across the input jack and about 200 ohms across the output jack. If there is no reading, that transducer is open and the pan must be replaced.

Still Have Questions?